Joshua J. Prince

Joshua J. Prince is an associate with Schaerr | Jaffe LLP. He specializes in appellate and religious liberty issues. He regularly represents religious colleges and universities and state governments in cases involving both complex statutory and constitutional questions.

Mr. Prince has worked on cases at every level of the federal judiciary, including the United States Supreme Court, where he helped draft the merits briefs in two granted cases. Mr. Prince's work at the trial level has also been extensive. He has assisted with the recruitment and preparation of expert witnesses, taken depositions, drafted critical motions, and participated in two federal trials.

He graduated with honors from Brigham Young University's J. Reuben Clark Law School, where he served as president of the Federalist Society and a Lead Articles Editor on the Brigham Young University Law Review. He was also active with the International Center for Law and Religion Studies during law school. Mr. Prince holds a B.A. in Russian from BYU.

In addition to his associate work, Mr. Prince assists Gene Schaerr with the management of the Supreme Court Advocacy Clinic at Brigham Young University.

Education

  • Brigham Young University (J.D.)
  • Brigham Young University (B.A.)

Clerkship

  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (upcoming)

Admissions

  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fourth Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the Eleventh Circuit
  • U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit
  • District of Columbia
  • Nevada¬†

Cutting Edge Advocacy

Schaerr|Jaffe lawyers have handled and won cutting edge cases in state and federal courts around the country, including eight cases in the U.S. Supreme Court.

Client Focused

Clients who choose Schaerr|Jaffe receive the highest quality representation without the conflicts and inefficiencies inherent in big-firm law practice.